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Angiostrongylus meningoencephalitis: survival from minimally conscious state to rehabilitation

The nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis has spread down the eastern coast of Australia over recent decades. A healthy 21-year-old man developed life-threatening eosinophilic meningoencephalitis following ingestion of a slug in Sydney. We describe the first case of this severity in which the patient survived.

Clinical record

A 21-year-old man presented with a 3-day history of insomnia and paraesthesia affecting his lower limbs bilaterally. He had no associated headache, meningism or fever. He was previously well with no significant medical history.

On admission, he had begun to develop progressive weakness of his lower limbs associated with pain and dysaesthesia. A full blood count showed a total white cell count of 10.6 × 109/L (reference interval [RI], 4.0–11.0 × 109/L) with mild eosinophilia (0.5 × 109/L [RI, < 0.4 × 109/L]). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of his brain and spine showed no abnormality. His cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was acellular, with normal glucose and protein levels.

A provisional diagnosis of Guillain–Barré syndrome was made and…

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